vanlife arsenal

Table of Contents

"Sourcing Your Outdoor Gear Arsenal"
 By Marisa Edmonton

Growing up in a small town in Western Colorado, I always considered myself a very outdoorsy person. My childhood is filled with memories of camping, hiking, skiing and floating my way around the valley I called home. My parents, who are both mostly self-taught in all their respective outdoor activities, instilled in me a sense of belonging in the outdoors and growing up I always felt at home in the outdoors.

 

It wasn’t until I got to college that I realized that “getting outdoors” was not as easy as I was raised to believe. It is a very white, male-dominated space and for the first time, my brown body felt out of place in the outdoors.

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I quickly learned one of the biggest barriers that exists for BIPOC and lower-income folks is money. It’s hard to feel like the outdoors is truly a place for everyone when the internet, social media and outdoor spheres are absolutely saturated with the “must-have”, newest, most advanced outdoor gear and technology. Unfortunately, for many folks, dropping $200-$500 dollars on the newest backpacking pack is out of the question. 

 

While many of my friends were dropping hundreds, if not thousands of dollars on the newest ice climbing gear, skiing trips to Canada, or climbing trips in the Tetons, I saved my summer money to buy a pair of used cross country skis so that I could also get outside during the cold Vermont winters without completely breaking my bank. 

Luckily my parents were both very crafty people when it came to gear, usually finding used equipment, shopping sales, or figuring out how to make do with what we had. In fact, my current sleeping bag is a hand-me-down from my mom & is older than me.  I learned a lot from them about how to build my gear closet on a budget – and then a lot on my own through research & trial and error. 


Here are my five tips and tricks on how to build your gear closet on a budget. 

1) BUY USED! 

 Most of my outdoor and athletic clothing is either hand-me-downs from my mom or bought from thrift shops or consignment stores. Make sure you do some research ahead of time into specific brands and materials that are made for your activity and are of good quality so you know what to look for at second-hand stores. 

 

A lot of my bigger gear I also bought used. Again, make sure you do some research beforehand, but Craigslist and Facebook Market Place are great places to buy things like used bikes, skis etc. Many areas also have stores dedicated to used gear like bikes, skis, backpacking packs and more. Some places will even have gear swaps which are like community yard sales for used gear. I bought my current bike for ¼ of the original price from Craigslist and my skis came from a second-hand gear store. 

 

2) Borrow! 

 

If you are new to an outdoor activity, just trying it out, or don’t do it often, try to borrow the gear. Many cities have “gear libraries” where you can rent gear for cheap or just outright borrow it for free like a library. Often these places are associated with organizations like university outdoor programs. I have rented everything from a winter coat, to dry bags to sleeping bags to rock climbing gear from places like these. It’s a great way to get gear for activities you don’t do often or are just trying out without buying brand new gear you won’t use often. 

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3) Invest in a few high-quality pieces of gear you KNOW you will use for many things: 

 If you are going to buy new, focus on pieces that are high-quality items that you know you will use often. That way the pieces you do buy new will last for years. You also want to make sure you will use them often, not just a few times a year. 

 

4) Use the same gear for multiple activities! 

 

My ski poles double as hiking poles, my waterproof-wind pants double as snow pants, my trail running shoes double as river shoes and I’ve used my backpacking pack for hiking the Vermont trail AND as luggage for long trips. Get creative! You can often find multiple uses for gear. 

 

5) Remember that you don’t need the newest gear to get outside!

 

Gatekeeping of outdoor space and activities by white, wealthy folks (especially white men) is real. I can’t lie and say that I never experience imposter syndrome when I enter an outdoor space. But remember that you DO belong there, whether you are just beginning in your outdoor journey, or are an experienced veteran. Take up your space, stay true to who you are and surround yourself with like-minded folks (or at least people who don’t care that your sleeping bag is older than they are). 

"Solar for Vanlife 101"
 By Mohit Kaura

Intro to Solar Power

On-board electricity is one of the most essential components of vanlife. While there are several ways to keep your on-board batteries charged, solar charging is the most versatile and eco-friendly option. Unlike the shore power plug-in option, you could be off-grid in the middle of nowhere and still be completely self-sustained. And you don’t have to worry about keeping the van running to charge your batteries. All you need is direct exposure to the sun, and you can have all the power you need. Let’s dive deeper into how solar power works.

Clean, robust and maintenance-free, solar energy is produced directly from sunlight falling on the photovoltaic cells of the solar panel. The electrical charge created in the cell causes electricity to flow, which can be stored in a battery to be used at your convenience.

Basic units and terminology

Current – Ampere (A)

Voltage – Volts (V)

Power/Wattage – Watts (W)

Power = Current X Voltage

So, 1 Watt = 1 Ampere X 1 Volt

Energy Stored in your battery – Watt-hour (Wh) or KiloWatt-Hour (kWh) {{1 kWh = 1000 Wh}}

Current coming straight from the battery – Direct Current (DC, 12 V)

Current coming from the inverter/power strip – Alternating Current (AC, 110 V)

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Solar Panels

Monocrystalline and Polycrystalline solar panels are two types of solar panels you’ll come across when shopping with popular brands such as GoPower. While monocrystalline solar panels are more expensive, they can reach over 20 percent efficiency. On the other hand, polycrystalline panels are cheaper, not only is their efficiency limited to 15 to 17 percent, but they also have a shorter lifespan due to lower resistance to light and heat. So, while monocrystalline panels might seem like a heftier initial investment, you will benefit from their higher density that allows for a higher power generation.

Lately, flexible solar panels have been getting popular due to their light weight, ease of install and the ability to adjust to the curvature of certain van roofs. They tend to be more expensive than the traditional mono or poly panels, but most people are not aware that these panels could have significantly lower efficiency ranging from 15 percent to as low as 7 percent. This is also the case with roll-out solar panels mats.

Generally speaking, the bigger the solar panel size is, the bigger their power output will be. So, a 100-Watt panel will almost be smaller than a 200-Watt. Solar panels come in all sorts of different wattages, ranging from as small as 50 Watts to as big as 500 Watts. Using multiple 100-Watt or 200-Watt panels are the most common choice for vanlifers as these panels offer flexibility in the layout design on your roof, should you want to add cargo box or a roof deck. Many people who don’t utilize the roof space for cargo go with one big 300-350 Watt panel, such as myself. 

Batteries

Almost all long-lasting batteries are compatible with solar charging. Most vanlifers prefer one of the more popular options such as lead-acid deep cycled (AGM or Gel), Lithium-Ion (Li-Ion), or Lithium Iron Phosphate (LiFePo) batteries. The sealed lead-acid batteries, though robust, are slowly phasing out due to the superiority of lithium-ion batteries when weight, life-cycles and efficiency are considered.

Lithium-ion batteries, though more expensive, are considerably lighter than lead-acid batteries, and go up to 200-300 cycles compared to 50-100 cycles for a lead-acid battery. The newer tech, Lithium Iron Phosphate (LiFePo) batteries are the lightest in weight and go up to 2000 to 12000 cycles. But, the high price for these batteries deter most buyers from buying these batteries, even though the higher initial investment is completely worth it.

The efficiency of batteries usually increases with voltage system, so a 6V battery system would be the least efficient and is usually employed in a golf cart or small electric vehicles, while a 48V system would be the most efficient, which is why it is used for off-grid homes. However, due to the small scale of a van, most people use 12V batteries and they work just fine for the amount of power one needs in a van. The common battery sizes vanlifers choose range from 100Amp-hours and 200 Amp-hours, with some going big with 300+ Amp-hour battery setups, though 200Amp-hour is sufficient for most vanlife electrical power needs.

Charge Controllers

Solar Panels will put out anywhere between 18V to 40V depending on their type and light sensitivity, which would destroy the 12V battery system. The charge controllers are crucial in ensuring that the battery receives the right current and voltage for its kind.

Charge controllers come in two categories, PWM and MPPT. MPPT chargers, though more expensive, can be up to 92% efficient, which is almost 30% more efficient than PWM controllers. The initial investment into buying the more expensive MPPT charge controller is definitely worth it when it comes to ensuring safe charging and longevity of the batteries.

Wiring Sizes

When wiring all your devices, it is essential that you use the appropriate size of wire to prevent them from melting due to an unexpected current surge. The wiring in the US uses AWG (American Wire Gauge) system. 1 AWG wire is the thickest wire available at hardware stores, and it keeps getting thinner and rated for less current as the number goes higher, as can be read below.

  • 14-gauge wire: 15 amps
  • 12-gauge wire: 20 amps
  • 10-gauge wire: 30 amps
  • 8-gauge wire: 40 amps
  • 6-gauge wire: 55 amps
  • 4-gauge wire: 70 amps
  • 3-gauge wire: 85 amps
  • 2-gauge wire: 95 amps

 So ideally, you want to use 2 AWG wire for connecting your batteries to each other and to the inverter, 4 AWG wire for connecting the charge controller to the batteries, and 8,10 or 12 AWG wires for lighting and power sockets, depending on what you intend to use with those wires.

Additionally, having circuit breakers and fuses is always recommended, even though the batteries and controllers come with internal fuses.

Power calculations

If you have a device, say a fan, rated for 50 Watts, it will pull 50 watts of power every second.

Let us assume the following are your regularly used devices. The average wattage rating (which is how many watts they consume every second) is mentioned next to them.

Fan – 50 Watts

LED lights – 30Watts (depending on the type/number of bulbs etc)

Charging Phone- 10 Watts

Charging Laptop — 60 Watts to 90 Watts, depending on the size

Charging Camera/Drone batteries – 40 Watts

Small Blender – 70 Watts (Low Setting)-350 Watts (High setting)

Fridge: 60 Watts (For a DC fridge), 250 Watts (AC), which is why most people prefer DC fridges.

Small Microwave- 700Watts

Say, you want to run all of them at the same time. This will result in a total usage of:

50+30+10+70+60+40+700 = 960Watts,

and say you use it all for an hour, it means you’ll use 90Watt*1 hr = 940Watt-hour, which in a 12V system is 940 Watt-hour/12V = 80Amp-hour. More info on these calculations below.

However, not all these devices will run for 24 hours every day, so you can always account for the total power usage by multiplying it with the number of hours you use it every day. For example, using the 50Watt fan for two hours would result in 50Watt* 2hr = 100Watt-hour of power usage.

If you have an inverter rated at 1000Watts, you can theoretically run all the above mentioned appliances without overloading the inverter. But say you run the microwave and the small blender at high speed together, your total usage will be: 700+350 = 1050 Watts, which will trigger an overload and the inverter will shut down. So, in this case, it will be beneficial to have a bigger inverter, say 2000Watts.

Simple mathematics, yeah?

Choosing the size of your solar array

So now, you have the size of your battery and inverter picked out, and now you want to add solar power to recharge your batteries and be a sustainable van-lifing badass.

Choosing the size of your solar array depends on how much and how fast you want to charge your batteries.

Common solar panel arrays that van-lifers use range from 100Watts to 600Watts, depending on their needs and rooftop space availability.

An important factor to consider is that solar panels generally output 75%-80% energy of what is listed, for example, a 100Watt panel will give you 80 Watts on a very sunny day at best.

Know that all days won’t be sunny, so always have extra energy on board. Keeping the battery at least half full at all times can be a lifesaver in bad weather conditions.

Say, you picked out a 200Ah (or 2400Wh), 12V battery and you want to charge it from completely dead to full. Assuming a 100-Watt panel can generate about 80 Watts consistently in direct sun on a clear day,

To charge a 200Ah (or 2400Wh) battery in this case will take 30 hours (80Watts*30hr = 2400Wh), which is clearly too long to wait, especially since you’ll only get 6-8 hours of full sun every day.

An alternate option for a faster charge would be to use a 300Watt panel producing 240 Watts on a clear day will charge your battery from dead to full in 10 hours. (5 hours if it is already half-full and so forth).

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Solar Installation

Roof Racks

Many people will install roof rails on their vans, and mount and bolt the panel directly on to the rails. Steel and Aluminum are common choices for roof rails, with aluminum being more durable and lighter, and thereby, more expensive. Some companies will also sell aluminum mounts for solar panels that could be bolted on to the roof, or the roof rack, depending on your needs.

Z-Brackets

Several companies will sell Z-brackets with their solar panels, that could be bolted directly on to the roof, but requires drilling several holes onto the roof. If you opt for this method, be sure to properly seal the holes with an industrial grade, waterproof sealant.

Double-sided tape / Eternabond

For flexible solar panels, one doesn’t have to bolt anything on to the roof. Their lightweight and flexible structure enables the use oof double sided tape on the underside of the panel which can be secured with the industrial grade tape, eternabond. The flexible panels do tend to heat up so it is recommended to use a plastic corrugated sheet under the panel to avoid direct contact with the roof.

 

 Now that you have a glimpse into the world of vanlife solar energy, we wish you the best of luck in choosing and installing your solar array so you, too can enjoy sustainable and clean energy as you explore the outdoors.

"On-the-road Essentials"
By Luu Phan and Alex Ortiz

Here’s an assortment of essential know-how we’ve gathered over our time living in our van!

Essential Know-How

1.) Water is Life.

Living in a van will quickly teach you how important access to water truly is. Unlike a traditional home where it can feel like there is an endless supply of water, in van life you will find yourself constantly checking your water level. You will naturally begin to conserve water as much as possible.

Our van holds 12 gallons of fresh water. This is plenty. In fact, you could probably make do with a 5 gallon jug. We use this as drinking water, to cook, wash dishes, and for the occasional vanlife bidet! Because we are typically in the city, we aren’t too concerned with running out of water and can let our fresh water tank get pretty low before making plans to refill. When we plan to be off-grid or traveling, though, we always try to top it off and have extra water on hand!

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2.) Dumping. 

And for the not so glamorous part of vanlife: dumping your grey water and emptying your toilet. We try our best to not create much grey water use (i.e. don’t wash dishes unless you really really need to) so that we don’t have to dump that often. Usually, this comes up about once a month or so. Two helpful resources to use to find local dump stations near you are Sanidumps.com and RVshare. You can find some free options as well! 

We have a 2.5 gallon Dometic cassette toilet and it’s really all we need. For two people, this usually means we have to empty it out every 4-5 days. You can usually do this in a public restroom at a local or regional park. Of course, this is only for number 1. On the rare occasion that we have to go number 2 in the van, we’ll usually find a nearby public restroom (grocery store, gas station, cafe, etc.). If it’s about to go down, just line a bag around your cassette toilet and make it happen. Yeah, we said it lol. 

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3.) Cooking. 

Cooking in a van can be a stressful part of your day if you are not organized. In such a tiny space, everything in your kitchen should matter! Stick to one good pot and one pan, max. To avoid creating a splatter mess when cooking, make sure you get a splatter screen. Also, heavy duty magnetic hooks are great for hanging pots, pans, cups, and kitchen utensils. Focus on quick and easy meals over elaborate recipes. Our vanlife friend Alex Tsuneta at @gooftrooperz authored a book called, “Cooking Tiny: A Vegan Cookbook for Nomadic Souls” where you can find simple yet tasty recipes for your tiny home living! Check it out!

4.) Sleeping. 

Find level ground! This will make or break your vanlife experience! Even the most comfy bed set up will have you dreading bedtime if your rig is parked on a slant. Finding level ground can be tricky if you are a city dweller as most of the city streets will have your rig dipped to one side. If you are in the city, allow yourself time to find level ground, it will make a big difference to your body! In the case that you are not able to find anything, having some van leveling blocks as a tool to level out your wheels is definitely worth taking along in your van.

5.) Gas.

Aside from food, filling up your gas tank will be one of your biggest expenses while living in a van. As many of you may have noticed, gas prices are especially high right now, so it’s important to be mindful of how much you actually need to move your rig around. For us, we focus on taking one big trip to the grocery store to re-up vs several small trips. Also, keep up with the daily maintenance of your vehicle. Believe it or not, regular oil changes, switching out your air filter, and making sure your tires are well inflated can make a huge difference in your gas efficiency. 

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Essential To Have

1.) Take Care of Your Home on Wheels! 
  • Portable battery jump starter. We have one from Noco that is super compact and efficient. Has saved us on several occasions when our engine battery died out! Also doubles up as a phone charger!
  • Tire pressure gauge
  • Spare tire & tools
  • Tool kit for emergency fixes
  • Flashlight/headlamp. There will be times when you may have to look under the hood at night.
  • Fire extinguisher. God forbid you need it, but make sure you always have one within reach just in case. 
 
2.) Kitchen/Dining Supplies/and more:
  • Food storage:
    • Stasher bags (great for storing veggies, leftovers, and snacks!)
    • Metal plates, bowls, cups – it’s key to have things that are unbreakable and also stackable to maximize space. We use items that we can use in the van and are durable enough to use when we are camping.
    • Disposables can be tempting when living in the van because you will not want to clean constantly, but is it important to aim to use as many reusable items as you can to reduce your waste (and do your part for mother Earth!)
  • Cooking supplies:
    • We have a rice cooker in our van and it seriously is one of the most used kitchen appliances we have. We use it to make rice, pasta, soups and a bunch of other meals! We would definitely recommend having a rice cooker or instant pot. Just keep in mind it draws a lot of power, so def use it to cook your meal and then unplug right away. We use it during the day only when we are getting enough sun for our solar.
    • Metal food containers that double as cookware! We try to limit having to wash dishes so this system works great for us! We are able to cook directly on it and it also stores our food in it.
  • Lighting: lanterns, lights for inside or outside (w battery, solar, whatever!)
    • Headlamps and/or flashlights. When you are living in your home and driving at night. You always want to be prepared if you have to go under the hood or work on the van at night. Having lights that are not dependent on your car battery or solar will be very important!
    • Battery operated twinkle lights inside the van helps to provide lighting in the night without being too bright.
 
3.) Maximizing Vanlife Living
Over time, we’ve found ways to maximize our space and add versatile gear to make our vanlife experience much more enjoyable without adding more stress.
 
  • Rooftop or hitch cargo box: Months into our vanlife journey we purchased a hitch cargo box and man was it life changing! We were able to add an additional 13 cubic feet of space in the rear of our vehicle and it allowed us to carry so much more and made our lives way easier.
  • Awning (helps extend your living space when you’re in an area that doesn’t require you to be stealthy)
  • Foldable camp chairs. Yeah, a few of those to pull up and kick back at your local park are a must!
  • Foldable table. Our compact Camco folding table works as both a dining room table inside and as a camp table outside. A must have!
  • Quick dry towels
Find items that have multiple uses. Sometimes what you need is already right there in front of you. Our cassette toilet doubles up as a stool to sit on. Your cutting board is also your table to put your food while laying in bed. That headlamp can also dim down to be your reading light. 
 

Staying Organized & Staying Clean

  1. Food storage. Store all of your food in mason jars or other airtight containers! Prevents bugs and ants from getting in them.
  2. Baskets & bins. Having a specific basket/bin or drawer for everything is a must to keep your tiny space organized.
  3. Packing cubes. Finding a system that works for clothes storage will be a game changer! We use packing cubes and they make our life much easier. We group our clothes into different categories – undergarments, t-shirts, active wear, etc. This helps when we need to pull something out, we are able to pull out just that packing cube, take what we need, and put the cube back in it’s designated home.
  4. The best way to save money is to cook as much as you can! Cooking in the van can be stressful, especially if you have a compact rig like ours. You will be tempted to get fast food or take out, and sometimes it makes sense to do so occasionally to not feel overwhelmed. But if you dedicate yourself to cooking quick meals and build a routine out of it, this will be a huge money saver!
  5. Cleaning supplies. Limit your cleaning supplies to just 1 or 2 products, saving space is crucial for vanlife. Like many vanlifers, our go to cleaning product is Dr. Bronner’s castile soap. It is a little more expensive than other dish soap but so worth it! It is eco-friendly, so you won’t have to worry about adding chemicals into areas when dumping your grey water. We use it for washing dishes, cleaning counters, and even as our body wash/shampoo!
  6. Variety of towels. We have different reusable towels designated for everything in the van. Our quick dry towels are so compact! We take them with us to the gym to shower and then hang them to dry overnight. They dry really quickly, allowing us to fold and put them away promptly instead of having a thick towel that takes forever to dry. We have baby washcloths that we use in place of disposable baby wipes. For those in between shower days, baby washcloths and a little castile soap can do wonders to keep you feeling fresh and clean! We also have designated towels we use for cooking and cleaning in our tiny kitchen.
 

Find Luu & Alex on Instagram @la_combi_life!

Photos courtesy of Luu & Alex.

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“Essential Apps”

By Ola Kalejaye

 

Most digital nomads have a couple apps in their toolkit to help with the day-to-day tasks that come naturally with life on the road. Here are a couple of our favorites!

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Campendium

*Campendium is an official sponsor of the BIPOC Guide

Campendium has tens of thousands of camping spots from National Parks & Forests, BLM land, State, County and City Parks, RV Parks and dispersed camping. All spots on the service are reviewed by the Campendium team and reviewed by it’s 350,000-strong membership. Along with verified user reviews, you can find cell service reports and campground photos. Check out the website campendium.com for awesome additional content like gear reviews, videos and blogs.

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“At Campendium, we are passionate about providing information that every traveler can use to find their perfect campsite by harnessing the power of community reviews.”
 
Download their app & check out their website HERE! 

 

Photo By Travelin-Tortuga | Circle Park Road Dispersed Camping

https://www.campendium.com/circle-park-road-dispersed-camping

Outdoorsy Black Women

Outdoorsy Black Women is a FREE social network for all Black Women to connect, celebrate, build community and share knowledge about outdoor activities and lifestyles. Through the app, members can: connect via common interest groups, share tricks of various outdoorsy trades, host and plan their own events and meetups and find new hobbies and share experiences and knowledge through blogs, forums and journals. 

Outdoorsy Black Women even has a directory of Black owned businesses, making it easy for members to create lists and share reviews of businesses they encounter on their travels.

Whether you’re just curious, a veteran Outdoorsy Black Woman or just wanting to connect with other adventurous Black Women this is the place to be! The App is FREE and can be downloaded for iOS and Android.

outdoorsyblackwomen.com 

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OUTDOORSY BLACK WOMEN (BIPOC) Diversify Van Life Off-road modern bipoc nomads off-grid Campervans Homeonwheels vanliferivals vanlove vandwelling vanlifeculture vanlifedreams vanlifejournal vanlifemovement diy vanlifecommunity exploremore vanderlust vanclan vanconversion vanlifediaries veganvanlife hippieclothes hippievibes hippiegirl hippiesoul hippielove hippieclothing crystals gypsysoul gypsy nature vwcamper Mercedes sprinter vwbus ourvanventure
 
Native Land

The Native Land app (and website Native-Land.ca) is a fantastic resource to aid in learning about the stolen Indigenous lands on which we live and recreate. It provides an easy way to search via its interactive map, sorted by territories, languages and treaties, and includes many links to websites for Tribal governments and organizations. While it is not an exhaustive list, it does an incredible job mapping out territories across both the North and South American continents and is constantly adding territories across the world to its map. 

native-land.ca

GasBuddy 

GasBuddy provides listings and price comparisons for finding the cheapest gas along your journey. If you’re interested in further savings you can easily get the free GasBuddy card which tethers to your regular bank card, and can save you up to 25c per gallon.

gasbuddy.com

OUTDOORSY BLACK WOMEN (BIPOC) Diversify Van Life Off-road modern bipoc nomads off-grid Campervans Homeonwheels vanliferivals vanlove vandwelling vanlifeculture vanlifedreams vanlifejournal vanlifemovement diy vanlifecommunity exploremore vanderlust vanclan vanconversion vanlifediaries veganvanlife hippieclothes hippievibes hippiegirl hippiesoul hippielove hippieclothing crystals gypsysoul gypsy nature vwcamper Mercedes sprinter vwbus ourvanventure
OUTDOORSY BLACK WOMEN (BIPOC) Diversify Van Life Off-road modern bipoc nomads off-grid Campervans Homeonwheels vanliferivals vanlove vandwelling vanlifeculture vanlifedreams vanlifejournal vanlifemovement diy vanlifecommunity exploremore vanderlust vanclan vanconversion vanlifediaries veganvanlife hippieclothes hippievibes hippiegirl hippiesoul hippielove hippieclothing crystals gypsysoul gypsy nature vwcamper Mercedes sprinter vwbus ourvanventure
iOverlander

iOverlander is an app with fully user-generated listings for camping spots, parking spots, water fill-ups, mechanics, laundromats and other useful utilities for road travelers. It’s important to note that there is little-to-no review of the quality or legality of camping spots so make sure to do your due diligence on whatever you find there.

ioverlander.com

Harvest Hosts

Harvest Hosts is a subscription service that offers free camping for self-contained RVs and travel rigs at over 2000 wineries, breweries, farms, museums, golf courses and attractions across the country. Memberships cost $99 per year, and grant members access to camp at any host location for one night at a time. Harvest Hosts encourages all members to make purchases from their hosts as a thank you for their hospitality, a great way to support local businesses.

harvesthosts.com

OUTDOORSY BLACK WOMEN (BIPOC) Diversify Van Life Off-road modern bipoc nomads off-grid Campervans Homeonwheels vanliferivals vanlove vandwelling vanlifeculture vanlifedreams vanlifejournal vanlifemovement diy vanlifecommunity exploremore vanderlust vanclan vanconversion vanlifediaries veganvanlife hippieclothes hippievibes hippiegirl hippiesoul hippielove hippieclothing crystals gypsysoul gypsy nature vwcamper Mercedes sprinter vwbus ourvanventure
OUTDOORSY BLACK WOMEN (BIPOC) Diversify Van Life Off-road modern bipoc nomads off-grid Campervans Homeonwheels vanliferivals vanlove vandwelling vanlifeculture vanlifedreams vanlifejournal vanlifemovement diy vanlifecommunity exploremore vanderlust vanclan vanconversion vanlifediaries veganvanlife hippieclothes hippievibes hippiegirl hippiesoul hippielove hippieclothing crystals gypsysoul gypsy nature vwcamper Mercedes sprinter vwbus ourvanventure

FreeRoam

FreeRoam is a campground search app with a social component geared towards finding other travelers including direct messaging and social groups. Its search feature has different filters including cell service, rig length, road difficulty and even filters for shade and crowdedness.

freeroam.app

About Our Sponsor

Campendium is a web and mobile application providing comprehensive campsite information and reviews for over 32,000 public and private camping spots in North America. The platform encourages community participation through campsite reviews, campground Q&As, and engaging video and article content.

Creating a safe environment for diverse voices and experiences in the outdoor recreation and travel space is important to Campendium. We recognize that creating this space requires action, and we are dedicated to joining and supporting partners who have the knowledge, skills, and passion to move these initiatives forward.

Download their app & check out their website HERE! 
OUTDOORSY BLACK WOMEN (BIPOC) Diversify Van Life Off-road modern bipoc nomads off-grid Campervans Homeonwheels vanliferivals vanlove vandwelling vanlifeculture vanlifedreams vanlifejournal vanlifemovement diy vanlifecommunity exploremore vanderlust vanclan vanconversion vanlifediaries veganvanlife hippieclothes hippievibes hippiegirl hippiesoul hippielove hippieclothing crystals gypsysoul gypsy nature vwcamper Mercedes sprinter vwbus ourvanventure

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